My Thoughts after Reading: The Fox Girl and the White Gazelle

The Fox Girl and the White GazelleThe Fox Girl and the White Gazelle by Victoria Williamson

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

My Thoughts after Reading

This middle grade book gives a good insight to refugees settling in the UK. Reema’s family has just arrived from war-torn Syria, having had several months of living in a refugee camp overseas. They arrive without knowing English nor the local culture. They need to pick all these up, and leave the past traumas behind. On top of this, they have to cope with prejudice.

Caylin is the school bully who intimidates her schoolmates into giving her money. As always, the bullying is only the tip of the iceberg. We learn the reasons behind her actions.

Externally they are different, but inwardly they have something in common. You can relate to the two things that brings them together: animals and shared talent. The story is written from the POVs of Reema and Caylin, in alternating chapters. They are heart-felt. You will find yourself rooting for them as you see them taking baby steps towards uncharted territories. You cannot help but turn page after page.

A great read.

Blurb

Reema runs to remember the life she left behind in Syria. Caylin runs to find what she’s lost. Under the grey Glasgow skies, twelve-year-old refugee Reema is struggling to find her place in a new country, with a new language and without her brother. But she isn’t the only one feeling lost. Her Glasgwegian neighbour Caylin is lonely and lashing out. When they discover an injured fox and her cubs hiding on their estate, the girls form a wary friendship. And they are more alike than they could have imagined: they both love to run. As Reema and Caylin learn to believe again, in themselves and in others, they find friendship, freedom and the discovery that home isn’t a place, it’s the people you love. Heartfelt and full of hope, The Fox Girl and the White Gazelle is an uplifting story about the power of friendship and belonging. Inspired by her work with young asylum seekers, debut novelist Victoria Williamson’s stunning story of displacement and discovery will speak to anyone who has ever asked ‘where do I belong?’

13 thoughts on “My Thoughts after Reading: The Fox Girl and the White Gazelle

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